Rambles on Fandom

my problem is my mamma raised me far too nice
to ever wish death on somebody, regardless of how much
they’d harmed me so instead i’m compiling a list
of odd karmatic punishments
for the assholes of my existence like

i hope the girl who ruined my senior year of high school
by bullying the hope out of my bones
has a bad hair day on every first date. i hope
the words she said behind my back tangle around
her head so when people meet her for the first time
they can see how unkind
she really is.

my mother and my father were talking in public
and a policeman asked her if she wanted the
‘dirty hispanic’ to leave her alone
and i really hope that policeman goes home
to heat that never works properly and that
the cold makes his bones ache, i hope the
warmth of my daddy’s sun never kisses
the sweaty temples of men who use their
position of power as an excuse to be racist

the man who hit me until i bled from the
corners of my mouth and who kissed me no matter
how much i asked him to stop better constantly get
his dick stuck in his zipper and i hope a large rash
develops because of it because maybe being
in constant pain will make him learn
some empathy

i want the teacher who told my friend joe
‘you can’t be a boy just because you say so’
to spill overheated 99-cent coffee on her ironed skirt
every other thursday, i hope it stains because
her words never washed out of his ears either

i hope the boy who broke my heart is
doing well, because i’m doing well too, but i want
the boy who broke my sister by promising forever
when he really meant ‘just until you give me everything’
to get a tattoo with a misspelling
just because i think it would be funny
since he was so afraid of commitment

the man who told my friend to kill herself, to just get it over
should wake up to a leak in his roof
that has no particular origin and constantly drips
onto his face no matter where he moves his pillow to
because maybe then he’ll have some idea about
drowning

i hope the people who told my brother
he couldn’t succeed
solely based on his disability
constantly hit their heads when getting into the car,
i want them to blink back little black dots
and wonder what they’ve ever done wrong to deserve
this and then i want them to see my brother’s company
on a full-page spread because he’s twenty-four and
making more money than they ever did

my math teacher told me most girls are stupid
with numbers and i hope his wife is funneling large
sums of his money into an offshore account without
him noticing while my english teacher told me
he didn’t expect much because i’m not a native speaker
so i really hope in class one day
he unknowingly passes out one of my poems

and i hope if you’ve been hurt, your life has
turned around. keep your head up,
square your shoulders, trust that
the universe will find some way to sort things out. hold on
until your heart mends. regardless of what happens,
know that happiness
is the best revenge.

I can’t wish true evil or true evil will come back to me but that doesn’t mean I want assholes to go around happy /// r.i.d | inkskinned  (via gebreken)


battlechicken:

tarot-sybarite:

sizvideos:

Video - Follow us

Okay, so there’s this Pulitzer-prize winning article that was published in the Washington Post a couple of years back.  It’s called Fatal Distraction, and in it the author tries to get to the bottom of why these incidents happen.
The profile of the parent who leaves his or his child to die in a hot car is all over the place.  Race, income level, education level, doesn’t matter.  A very small minority have a history of neglect or abuse, but the vast majority are clearly not abusive parents.  If anything, they’re the kind of parents who dote on their children.
So the author asked a memory expert: if the parents are so focused on the well-being of their children in general, how does this possibly happen? And the memory expert explained it thusly:
Firstly, back in the ’90s, car safety experts announced that the airbags on the passenger-side front seat could kill children, and recommended that child safety seats be moved to the back of the car.  Next, shortly afterwards they recommend that to maximize safety for the very, very young, the seats be turned to that they face the rear.
Following these guidelines—which most parents do, in order to protect their children—does protect the child.  It also very effectively removes a child from a parent’s line of sight.
So what?  Who cares if you can’t see the kids?  What kind of parents forget their kid in the back seat of the car?
The memory expert the author spoke to is a molecular physiologist who researches how stress, emotion, and memory interact with each other.  And he has found the following:
For purposes of this discussion, the brain has two zones.  The Upper Zone has the pre-frontal cortex (which thinks and analyzes) and the hippocampus (makes/holds onto immediate memories).  The Lower Zone has the basal ganglia, which handles voluntary but unconscious actions, like swallowing, leg crossing and uncrossing, etc, stuff you choose to do, but don’t really realize you’re making that choice. 
Think of the two Zones as painters.  The Upper Zone is a master of fine and delicate techniques, able to balance several intricate tasks, like a Da Vinci.  The Lower Zone is like the friend that comes over to help you paint your house in exchange for beer and pizza—lots of enthusiasm and energy, but he handles things by flinging paint at the walls. Which does get the job done, admittedly, even if he can’t do much else.
In your brain, Da Vinci and Pizza-and-Beer Guy usually work separately.  But when a job requires familiar, routine motor skills, Da Vinci will buy a six-pack and ask Pizza-and-Beer Guy to come over and help  And they actually work quite well together, for the most part.  Pizza-and-Beer Painter quickly and effectively distributes the paint in the large background areas, and then Da Vinci comes in, tidies up a little, and then starts filling in with the Mona Lisa. 
In real world terms, the neurological Da Vinci + Pizza-and-Beer Guy team-up explains why you can drive to work or school in the morning, and not really recall which route you took to get there or what you saw on the way over.  Da Vinci is in the Upper Zone, organizing your day and reviewing tasks with you, while Pizza-and-Beer Guy is downstairs in the Lower Zone driving your car.  Da Vinci knows that ultimately, the scenery isn’t that important and so doesn’t bother to pay attention to it, while Pizza-and-Beer Guy has all he can handle with getting you safely to work, so he ignores the scenery, too.
The memory expert found that if stressors are introduced in the brain, such as high emotion, lack of sleep, and/or change in routine, then Da Vinci gets overwhelmed trying to manage everything, and Pizza-and-Beer Guy doubles down while still clinging to what he knows. The end result is that Pizza-and-Beer Guy will accidentally paint over large portions  of the Mona Lisa while Da Vinci is dealing with the stress…and Da Vinci won’t notice unless some kind of alarm sounds.
The memory expert then pointed to the case of a mom who exemplified the above:
She had been up most of the night babysitting and caring for her own cranky child (stressor: lack of sleep)
The tired baby slept in his car seat, instead of babbling like he usually did (no audio reminder of child)
Because the mom was planning on bringing the baby’s usual car seat to a fire station for professional installation, the baby was in a different car seat (stressor: change in routine) located behind the driver’s seat where he could not be seen from the rear view mirror (no visual reminder of the child)
Because the family’s second car was being loaned to a relative, the mom drove her husband to work that day (stressor: change in routine #2)
Because her husband was sitting in the front passenger seat, the baby’s diaper bag was placed in the back seat, instead of in the front passenger seat where the mom could see it (stressor: no visual reminder of child, #2)
Because of cell phone conversations with her boss about a crisis at work and with a young relative in trouble, the mom spent most of the drive stressed out solving other people’s problems (stressor: dealing with multiple crises)
This mom’s neurological Da Vinci was swamped dealing with stress. Her neurological Pizza-and-Beer Guy was swamped trying to get her to work that morning.  He painted over the baby, and there were no alarms—no visual or audio reminders—to warn Da Vinci that it had happened.
I say all of that to say this.  Whether or not you leave your baby to die in a hot car has nothing to do with being a fool or loving your kids.  It has to do with unintentional failures of memory under stress.  
Memory is a machine, and it is not perfect.  If you’re capable of forgetting your cell phone, you’re capable of forgetting your child.
Once you understand that, then you can take steps to build in some safeties:
ALWAYS PUT SOMETHING YOU NEED TO HAVE FOR WORK OR SCHOOL IN THE CAR NEXT TO YOUR BABY—your purse, your work ID badge, your laptop or tablet, your cell phone, whatever.  It forces you to look back there, which in turn means you’ll see your baby.
MAKE ARRANGEMENTS WITH YOUR CHILD CARE PROVIDER THAT THEY WILL ALWAYS CALL YOU IF YOU DON’T SHOW UP WITH YOUR BABY, AND THAT YOU WILL ALWAYS CALL THEM IF YOU DON’T SHOW UP AS SCHEDULED.  If they expect to see you by 8am with the baby, and you’re not there, your cell and your office phone should start ringing at 8:01am.
If you can afford it, consider buying a child alert to let you know that the baby’s still in the car.  The one I linked to consists of a sensor that you attach to the baby’s clothes, and a key chain alarm.  It sounds an alarm on your key chain if you walk more than fifteen feet away from the sensor.  Additional key fobs can be purchased.  Other devices are outlined in this article.
The death of a child left in a car is not a failure of love.  It’s a failure of memory.  And it can happen to anyone.
Visit http://www.kidsandcars.org/ for more info.

This is good information, fellow parents, please read! 
battlechicken:

tarot-sybarite:

sizvideos:

Video - Follow us

Okay, so there’s this Pulitzer-prize winning article that was published in the Washington Post a couple of years back.  It’s called Fatal Distraction, and in it the author tries to get to the bottom of why these incidents happen.
The profile of the parent who leaves his or his child to die in a hot car is all over the place.  Race, income level, education level, doesn’t matter.  A very small minority have a history of neglect or abuse, but the vast majority are clearly not abusive parents.  If anything, they’re the kind of parents who dote on their children.
So the author asked a memory expert: if the parents are so focused on the well-being of their children in general, how does this possibly happen? And the memory expert explained it thusly:
Firstly, back in the ’90s, car safety experts announced that the airbags on the passenger-side front seat could kill children, and recommended that child safety seats be moved to the back of the car.  Next, shortly afterwards they recommend that to maximize safety for the very, very young, the seats be turned to that they face the rear.
Following these guidelines—which most parents do, in order to protect their children—does protect the child.  It also very effectively removes a child from a parent’s line of sight.
So what?  Who cares if you can’t see the kids?  What kind of parents forget their kid in the back seat of the car?
The memory expert the author spoke to is a molecular physiologist who researches how stress, emotion, and memory interact with each other.  And he has found the following:
For purposes of this discussion, the brain has two zones.  The Upper Zone has the pre-frontal cortex (which thinks and analyzes) and the hippocampus (makes/holds onto immediate memories).  The Lower Zone has the basal ganglia, which handles voluntary but unconscious actions, like swallowing, leg crossing and uncrossing, etc, stuff you choose to do, but don’t really realize you’re making that choice. 
Think of the two Zones as painters.  The Upper Zone is a master of fine and delicate techniques, able to balance several intricate tasks, like a Da Vinci.  The Lower Zone is like the friend that comes over to help you paint your house in exchange for beer and pizza—lots of enthusiasm and energy, but he handles things by flinging paint at the walls. Which does get the job done, admittedly, even if he can’t do much else.
In your brain, Da Vinci and Pizza-and-Beer Guy usually work separately.  But when a job requires familiar, routine motor skills, Da Vinci will buy a six-pack and ask Pizza-and-Beer Guy to come over and help  And they actually work quite well together, for the most part.  Pizza-and-Beer Painter quickly and effectively distributes the paint in the large background areas, and then Da Vinci comes in, tidies up a little, and then starts filling in with the Mona Lisa. 
In real world terms, the neurological Da Vinci + Pizza-and-Beer Guy team-up explains why you can drive to work or school in the morning, and not really recall which route you took to get there or what you saw on the way over.  Da Vinci is in the Upper Zone, organizing your day and reviewing tasks with you, while Pizza-and-Beer Guy is downstairs in the Lower Zone driving your car.  Da Vinci knows that ultimately, the scenery isn’t that important and so doesn’t bother to pay attention to it, while Pizza-and-Beer Guy has all he can handle with getting you safely to work, so he ignores the scenery, too.
The memory expert found that if stressors are introduced in the brain, such as high emotion, lack of sleep, and/or change in routine, then Da Vinci gets overwhelmed trying to manage everything, and Pizza-and-Beer Guy doubles down while still clinging to what he knows. The end result is that Pizza-and-Beer Guy will accidentally paint over large portions  of the Mona Lisa while Da Vinci is dealing with the stress…and Da Vinci won’t notice unless some kind of alarm sounds.
The memory expert then pointed to the case of a mom who exemplified the above:
She had been up most of the night babysitting and caring for her own cranky child (stressor: lack of sleep)
The tired baby slept in his car seat, instead of babbling like he usually did (no audio reminder of child)
Because the mom was planning on bringing the baby’s usual car seat to a fire station for professional installation, the baby was in a different car seat (stressor: change in routine) located behind the driver’s seat where he could not be seen from the rear view mirror (no visual reminder of the child)
Because the family’s second car was being loaned to a relative, the mom drove her husband to work that day (stressor: change in routine #2)
Because her husband was sitting in the front passenger seat, the baby’s diaper bag was placed in the back seat, instead of in the front passenger seat where the mom could see it (stressor: no visual reminder of child, #2)
Because of cell phone conversations with her boss about a crisis at work and with a young relative in trouble, the mom spent most of the drive stressed out solving other people’s problems (stressor: dealing with multiple crises)
This mom’s neurological Da Vinci was swamped dealing with stress. Her neurological Pizza-and-Beer Guy was swamped trying to get her to work that morning.  He painted over the baby, and there were no alarms—no visual or audio reminders—to warn Da Vinci that it had happened.
I say all of that to say this.  Whether or not you leave your baby to die in a hot car has nothing to do with being a fool or loving your kids.  It has to do with unintentional failures of memory under stress.  
Memory is a machine, and it is not perfect.  If you’re capable of forgetting your cell phone, you’re capable of forgetting your child.
Once you understand that, then you can take steps to build in some safeties:
ALWAYS PUT SOMETHING YOU NEED TO HAVE FOR WORK OR SCHOOL IN THE CAR NEXT TO YOUR BABY—your purse, your work ID badge, your laptop or tablet, your cell phone, whatever.  It forces you to look back there, which in turn means you’ll see your baby.
MAKE ARRANGEMENTS WITH YOUR CHILD CARE PROVIDER THAT THEY WILL ALWAYS CALL YOU IF YOU DON’T SHOW UP WITH YOUR BABY, AND THAT YOU WILL ALWAYS CALL THEM IF YOU DON’T SHOW UP AS SCHEDULED.  If they expect to see you by 8am with the baby, and you’re not there, your cell and your office phone should start ringing at 8:01am.
If you can afford it, consider buying a child alert to let you know that the baby’s still in the car.  The one I linked to consists of a sensor that you attach to the baby’s clothes, and a key chain alarm.  It sounds an alarm on your key chain if you walk more than fifteen feet away from the sensor.  Additional key fobs can be purchased.  Other devices are outlined in this article.
The death of a child left in a car is not a failure of love.  It’s a failure of memory.  And it can happen to anyone.
Visit http://www.kidsandcars.org/ for more info.

This is good information, fellow parents, please read! 
battlechicken:

tarot-sybarite:

sizvideos:

Video - Follow us

Okay, so there’s this Pulitzer-prize winning article that was published in the Washington Post a couple of years back.  It’s called Fatal Distraction, and in it the author tries to get to the bottom of why these incidents happen.
The profile of the parent who leaves his or his child to die in a hot car is all over the place.  Race, income level, education level, doesn’t matter.  A very small minority have a history of neglect or abuse, but the vast majority are clearly not abusive parents.  If anything, they’re the kind of parents who dote on their children.
So the author asked a memory expert: if the parents are so focused on the well-being of their children in general, how does this possibly happen? And the memory expert explained it thusly:
Firstly, back in the ’90s, car safety experts announced that the airbags on the passenger-side front seat could kill children, and recommended that child safety seats be moved to the back of the car.  Next, shortly afterwards they recommend that to maximize safety for the very, very young, the seats be turned to that they face the rear.
Following these guidelines—which most parents do, in order to protect their children—does protect the child.  It also very effectively removes a child from a parent’s line of sight.
So what?  Who cares if you can’t see the kids?  What kind of parents forget their kid in the back seat of the car?
The memory expert the author spoke to is a molecular physiologist who researches how stress, emotion, and memory interact with each other.  And he has found the following:
For purposes of this discussion, the brain has two zones.  The Upper Zone has the pre-frontal cortex (which thinks and analyzes) and the hippocampus (makes/holds onto immediate memories).  The Lower Zone has the basal ganglia, which handles voluntary but unconscious actions, like swallowing, leg crossing and uncrossing, etc, stuff you choose to do, but don’t really realize you’re making that choice. 
Think of the two Zones as painters.  The Upper Zone is a master of fine and delicate techniques, able to balance several intricate tasks, like a Da Vinci.  The Lower Zone is like the friend that comes over to help you paint your house in exchange for beer and pizza—lots of enthusiasm and energy, but he handles things by flinging paint at the walls. Which does get the job done, admittedly, even if he can’t do much else.
In your brain, Da Vinci and Pizza-and-Beer Guy usually work separately.  But when a job requires familiar, routine motor skills, Da Vinci will buy a six-pack and ask Pizza-and-Beer Guy to come over and help  And they actually work quite well together, for the most part.  Pizza-and-Beer Painter quickly and effectively distributes the paint in the large background areas, and then Da Vinci comes in, tidies up a little, and then starts filling in with the Mona Lisa. 
In real world terms, the neurological Da Vinci + Pizza-and-Beer Guy team-up explains why you can drive to work or school in the morning, and not really recall which route you took to get there or what you saw on the way over.  Da Vinci is in the Upper Zone, organizing your day and reviewing tasks with you, while Pizza-and-Beer Guy is downstairs in the Lower Zone driving your car.  Da Vinci knows that ultimately, the scenery isn’t that important and so doesn’t bother to pay attention to it, while Pizza-and-Beer Guy has all he can handle with getting you safely to work, so he ignores the scenery, too.
The memory expert found that if stressors are introduced in the brain, such as high emotion, lack of sleep, and/or change in routine, then Da Vinci gets overwhelmed trying to manage everything, and Pizza-and-Beer Guy doubles down while still clinging to what he knows. The end result is that Pizza-and-Beer Guy will accidentally paint over large portions  of the Mona Lisa while Da Vinci is dealing with the stress…and Da Vinci won’t notice unless some kind of alarm sounds.
The memory expert then pointed to the case of a mom who exemplified the above:
She had been up most of the night babysitting and caring for her own cranky child (stressor: lack of sleep)
The tired baby slept in his car seat, instead of babbling like he usually did (no audio reminder of child)
Because the mom was planning on bringing the baby’s usual car seat to a fire station for professional installation, the baby was in a different car seat (stressor: change in routine) located behind the driver’s seat where he could not be seen from the rear view mirror (no visual reminder of the child)
Because the family’s second car was being loaned to a relative, the mom drove her husband to work that day (stressor: change in routine #2)
Because her husband was sitting in the front passenger seat, the baby’s diaper bag was placed in the back seat, instead of in the front passenger seat where the mom could see it (stressor: no visual reminder of child, #2)
Because of cell phone conversations with her boss about a crisis at work and with a young relative in trouble, the mom spent most of the drive stressed out solving other people’s problems (stressor: dealing with multiple crises)
This mom’s neurological Da Vinci was swamped dealing with stress. Her neurological Pizza-and-Beer Guy was swamped trying to get her to work that morning.  He painted over the baby, and there were no alarms—no visual or audio reminders—to warn Da Vinci that it had happened.
I say all of that to say this.  Whether or not you leave your baby to die in a hot car has nothing to do with being a fool or loving your kids.  It has to do with unintentional failures of memory under stress.  
Memory is a machine, and it is not perfect.  If you’re capable of forgetting your cell phone, you’re capable of forgetting your child.
Once you understand that, then you can take steps to build in some safeties:
ALWAYS PUT SOMETHING YOU NEED TO HAVE FOR WORK OR SCHOOL IN THE CAR NEXT TO YOUR BABY—your purse, your work ID badge, your laptop or tablet, your cell phone, whatever.  It forces you to look back there, which in turn means you’ll see your baby.
MAKE ARRANGEMENTS WITH YOUR CHILD CARE PROVIDER THAT THEY WILL ALWAYS CALL YOU IF YOU DON’T SHOW UP WITH YOUR BABY, AND THAT YOU WILL ALWAYS CALL THEM IF YOU DON’T SHOW UP AS SCHEDULED.  If they expect to see you by 8am with the baby, and you’re not there, your cell and your office phone should start ringing at 8:01am.
If you can afford it, consider buying a child alert to let you know that the baby’s still in the car.  The one I linked to consists of a sensor that you attach to the baby’s clothes, and a key chain alarm.  It sounds an alarm on your key chain if you walk more than fifteen feet away from the sensor.  Additional key fobs can be purchased.  Other devices are outlined in this article.
The death of a child left in a car is not a failure of love.  It’s a failure of memory.  And it can happen to anyone.
Visit http://www.kidsandcars.org/ for more info.

This is good information, fellow parents, please read! 
battlechicken:

tarot-sybarite:

sizvideos:

Video - Follow us

Okay, so there’s this Pulitzer-prize winning article that was published in the Washington Post a couple of years back.  It’s called Fatal Distraction, and in it the author tries to get to the bottom of why these incidents happen.
The profile of the parent who leaves his or his child to die in a hot car is all over the place.  Race, income level, education level, doesn’t matter.  A very small minority have a history of neglect or abuse, but the vast majority are clearly not abusive parents.  If anything, they’re the kind of parents who dote on their children.
So the author asked a memory expert: if the parents are so focused on the well-being of their children in general, how does this possibly happen? And the memory expert explained it thusly:
Firstly, back in the ’90s, car safety experts announced that the airbags on the passenger-side front seat could kill children, and recommended that child safety seats be moved to the back of the car.  Next, shortly afterwards they recommend that to maximize safety for the very, very young, the seats be turned to that they face the rear.
Following these guidelines—which most parents do, in order to protect their children—does protect the child.  It also very effectively removes a child from a parent’s line of sight.
So what?  Who cares if you can’t see the kids?  What kind of parents forget their kid in the back seat of the car?
The memory expert the author spoke to is a molecular physiologist who researches how stress, emotion, and memory interact with each other.  And he has found the following:
For purposes of this discussion, the brain has two zones.  The Upper Zone has the pre-frontal cortex (which thinks and analyzes) and the hippocampus (makes/holds onto immediate memories).  The Lower Zone has the basal ganglia, which handles voluntary but unconscious actions, like swallowing, leg crossing and uncrossing, etc, stuff you choose to do, but don’t really realize you’re making that choice. 
Think of the two Zones as painters.  The Upper Zone is a master of fine and delicate techniques, able to balance several intricate tasks, like a Da Vinci.  The Lower Zone is like the friend that comes over to help you paint your house in exchange for beer and pizza—lots of enthusiasm and energy, but he handles things by flinging paint at the walls. Which does get the job done, admittedly, even if he can’t do much else.
In your brain, Da Vinci and Pizza-and-Beer Guy usually work separately.  But when a job requires familiar, routine motor skills, Da Vinci will buy a six-pack and ask Pizza-and-Beer Guy to come over and help  And they actually work quite well together, for the most part.  Pizza-and-Beer Painter quickly and effectively distributes the paint in the large background areas, and then Da Vinci comes in, tidies up a little, and then starts filling in with the Mona Lisa. 
In real world terms, the neurological Da Vinci + Pizza-and-Beer Guy team-up explains why you can drive to work or school in the morning, and not really recall which route you took to get there or what you saw on the way over.  Da Vinci is in the Upper Zone, organizing your day and reviewing tasks with you, while Pizza-and-Beer Guy is downstairs in the Lower Zone driving your car.  Da Vinci knows that ultimately, the scenery isn’t that important and so doesn’t bother to pay attention to it, while Pizza-and-Beer Guy has all he can handle with getting you safely to work, so he ignores the scenery, too.
The memory expert found that if stressors are introduced in the brain, such as high emotion, lack of sleep, and/or change in routine, then Da Vinci gets overwhelmed trying to manage everything, and Pizza-and-Beer Guy doubles down while still clinging to what he knows. The end result is that Pizza-and-Beer Guy will accidentally paint over large portions  of the Mona Lisa while Da Vinci is dealing with the stress…and Da Vinci won’t notice unless some kind of alarm sounds.
The memory expert then pointed to the case of a mom who exemplified the above:
She had been up most of the night babysitting and caring for her own cranky child (stressor: lack of sleep)
The tired baby slept in his car seat, instead of babbling like he usually did (no audio reminder of child)
Because the mom was planning on bringing the baby’s usual car seat to a fire station for professional installation, the baby was in a different car seat (stressor: change in routine) located behind the driver’s seat where he could not be seen from the rear view mirror (no visual reminder of the child)
Because the family’s second car was being loaned to a relative, the mom drove her husband to work that day (stressor: change in routine #2)
Because her husband was sitting in the front passenger seat, the baby’s diaper bag was placed in the back seat, instead of in the front passenger seat where the mom could see it (stressor: no visual reminder of child, #2)
Because of cell phone conversations with her boss about a crisis at work and with a young relative in trouble, the mom spent most of the drive stressed out solving other people’s problems (stressor: dealing with multiple crises)
This mom’s neurological Da Vinci was swamped dealing with stress. Her neurological Pizza-and-Beer Guy was swamped trying to get her to work that morning.  He painted over the baby, and there were no alarms—no visual or audio reminders—to warn Da Vinci that it had happened.
I say all of that to say this.  Whether or not you leave your baby to die in a hot car has nothing to do with being a fool or loving your kids.  It has to do with unintentional failures of memory under stress.  
Memory is a machine, and it is not perfect.  If you’re capable of forgetting your cell phone, you’re capable of forgetting your child.
Once you understand that, then you can take steps to build in some safeties:
ALWAYS PUT SOMETHING YOU NEED TO HAVE FOR WORK OR SCHOOL IN THE CAR NEXT TO YOUR BABY—your purse, your work ID badge, your laptop or tablet, your cell phone, whatever.  It forces you to look back there, which in turn means you’ll see your baby.
MAKE ARRANGEMENTS WITH YOUR CHILD CARE PROVIDER THAT THEY WILL ALWAYS CALL YOU IF YOU DON’T SHOW UP WITH YOUR BABY, AND THAT YOU WILL ALWAYS CALL THEM IF YOU DON’T SHOW UP AS SCHEDULED.  If they expect to see you by 8am with the baby, and you’re not there, your cell and your office phone should start ringing at 8:01am.
If you can afford it, consider buying a child alert to let you know that the baby’s still in the car.  The one I linked to consists of a sensor that you attach to the baby’s clothes, and a key chain alarm.  It sounds an alarm on your key chain if you walk more than fifteen feet away from the sensor.  Additional key fobs can be purchased.  Other devices are outlined in this article.
The death of a child left in a car is not a failure of love.  It’s a failure of memory.  And it can happen to anyone.
Visit http://www.kidsandcars.org/ for more info.

This is good information, fellow parents, please read! 
battlechicken:

tarot-sybarite:

sizvideos:

Video - Follow us

Okay, so there’s this Pulitzer-prize winning article that was published in the Washington Post a couple of years back.  It’s called Fatal Distraction, and in it the author tries to get to the bottom of why these incidents happen.
The profile of the parent who leaves his or his child to die in a hot car is all over the place.  Race, income level, education level, doesn’t matter.  A very small minority have a history of neglect or abuse, but the vast majority are clearly not abusive parents.  If anything, they’re the kind of parents who dote on their children.
So the author asked a memory expert: if the parents are so focused on the well-being of their children in general, how does this possibly happen? And the memory expert explained it thusly:
Firstly, back in the ’90s, car safety experts announced that the airbags on the passenger-side front seat could kill children, and recommended that child safety seats be moved to the back of the car.  Next, shortly afterwards they recommend that to maximize safety for the very, very young, the seats be turned to that they face the rear.
Following these guidelines—which most parents do, in order to protect their children—does protect the child.  It also very effectively removes a child from a parent’s line of sight.
So what?  Who cares if you can’t see the kids?  What kind of parents forget their kid in the back seat of the car?
The memory expert the author spoke to is a molecular physiologist who researches how stress, emotion, and memory interact with each other.  And he has found the following:
For purposes of this discussion, the brain has two zones.  The Upper Zone has the pre-frontal cortex (which thinks and analyzes) and the hippocampus (makes/holds onto immediate memories).  The Lower Zone has the basal ganglia, which handles voluntary but unconscious actions, like swallowing, leg crossing and uncrossing, etc, stuff you choose to do, but don’t really realize you’re making that choice. 
Think of the two Zones as painters.  The Upper Zone is a master of fine and delicate techniques, able to balance several intricate tasks, like a Da Vinci.  The Lower Zone is like the friend that comes over to help you paint your house in exchange for beer and pizza—lots of enthusiasm and energy, but he handles things by flinging paint at the walls. Which does get the job done, admittedly, even if he can’t do much else.
In your brain, Da Vinci and Pizza-and-Beer Guy usually work separately.  But when a job requires familiar, routine motor skills, Da Vinci will buy a six-pack and ask Pizza-and-Beer Guy to come over and help  And they actually work quite well together, for the most part.  Pizza-and-Beer Painter quickly and effectively distributes the paint in the large background areas, and then Da Vinci comes in, tidies up a little, and then starts filling in with the Mona Lisa. 
In real world terms, the neurological Da Vinci + Pizza-and-Beer Guy team-up explains why you can drive to work or school in the morning, and not really recall which route you took to get there or what you saw on the way over.  Da Vinci is in the Upper Zone, organizing your day and reviewing tasks with you, while Pizza-and-Beer Guy is downstairs in the Lower Zone driving your car.  Da Vinci knows that ultimately, the scenery isn’t that important and so doesn’t bother to pay attention to it, while Pizza-and-Beer Guy has all he can handle with getting you safely to work, so he ignores the scenery, too.
The memory expert found that if stressors are introduced in the brain, such as high emotion, lack of sleep, and/or change in routine, then Da Vinci gets overwhelmed trying to manage everything, and Pizza-and-Beer Guy doubles down while still clinging to what he knows. The end result is that Pizza-and-Beer Guy will accidentally paint over large portions  of the Mona Lisa while Da Vinci is dealing with the stress…and Da Vinci won’t notice unless some kind of alarm sounds.
The memory expert then pointed to the case of a mom who exemplified the above:
She had been up most of the night babysitting and caring for her own cranky child (stressor: lack of sleep)
The tired baby slept in his car seat, instead of babbling like he usually did (no audio reminder of child)
Because the mom was planning on bringing the baby’s usual car seat to a fire station for professional installation, the baby was in a different car seat (stressor: change in routine) located behind the driver’s seat where he could not be seen from the rear view mirror (no visual reminder of the child)
Because the family’s second car was being loaned to a relative, the mom drove her husband to work that day (stressor: change in routine #2)
Because her husband was sitting in the front passenger seat, the baby’s diaper bag was placed in the back seat, instead of in the front passenger seat where the mom could see it (stressor: no visual reminder of child, #2)
Because of cell phone conversations with her boss about a crisis at work and with a young relative in trouble, the mom spent most of the drive stressed out solving other people’s problems (stressor: dealing with multiple crises)
This mom’s neurological Da Vinci was swamped dealing with stress. Her neurological Pizza-and-Beer Guy was swamped trying to get her to work that morning.  He painted over the baby, and there were no alarms—no visual or audio reminders—to warn Da Vinci that it had happened.
I say all of that to say this.  Whether or not you leave your baby to die in a hot car has nothing to do with being a fool or loving your kids.  It has to do with unintentional failures of memory under stress.  
Memory is a machine, and it is not perfect.  If you’re capable of forgetting your cell phone, you’re capable of forgetting your child.
Once you understand that, then you can take steps to build in some safeties:
ALWAYS PUT SOMETHING YOU NEED TO HAVE FOR WORK OR SCHOOL IN THE CAR NEXT TO YOUR BABY—your purse, your work ID badge, your laptop or tablet, your cell phone, whatever.  It forces you to look back there, which in turn means you’ll see your baby.
MAKE ARRANGEMENTS WITH YOUR CHILD CARE PROVIDER THAT THEY WILL ALWAYS CALL YOU IF YOU DON’T SHOW UP WITH YOUR BABY, AND THAT YOU WILL ALWAYS CALL THEM IF YOU DON’T SHOW UP AS SCHEDULED.  If they expect to see you by 8am with the baby, and you’re not there, your cell and your office phone should start ringing at 8:01am.
If you can afford it, consider buying a child alert to let you know that the baby’s still in the car.  The one I linked to consists of a sensor that you attach to the baby’s clothes, and a key chain alarm.  It sounds an alarm on your key chain if you walk more than fifteen feet away from the sensor.  Additional key fobs can be purchased.  Other devices are outlined in this article.
The death of a child left in a car is not a failure of love.  It’s a failure of memory.  And it can happen to anyone.
Visit http://www.kidsandcars.org/ for more info.

This is good information, fellow parents, please read! 
battlechicken:

tarot-sybarite:

sizvideos:

Video - Follow us

Okay, so there’s this Pulitzer-prize winning article that was published in the Washington Post a couple of years back.  It’s called Fatal Distraction, and in it the author tries to get to the bottom of why these incidents happen.
The profile of the parent who leaves his or his child to die in a hot car is all over the place.  Race, income level, education level, doesn’t matter.  A very small minority have a history of neglect or abuse, but the vast majority are clearly not abusive parents.  If anything, they’re the kind of parents who dote on their children.
So the author asked a memory expert: if the parents are so focused on the well-being of their children in general, how does this possibly happen? And the memory expert explained it thusly:
Firstly, back in the ’90s, car safety experts announced that the airbags on the passenger-side front seat could kill children, and recommended that child safety seats be moved to the back of the car.  Next, shortly afterwards they recommend that to maximize safety for the very, very young, the seats be turned to that they face the rear.
Following these guidelines—which most parents do, in order to protect their children—does protect the child.  It also very effectively removes a child from a parent’s line of sight.
So what?  Who cares if you can’t see the kids?  What kind of parents forget their kid in the back seat of the car?
The memory expert the author spoke to is a molecular physiologist who researches how stress, emotion, and memory interact with each other.  And he has found the following:
For purposes of this discussion, the brain has two zones.  The Upper Zone has the pre-frontal cortex (which thinks and analyzes) and the hippocampus (makes/holds onto immediate memories).  The Lower Zone has the basal ganglia, which handles voluntary but unconscious actions, like swallowing, leg crossing and uncrossing, etc, stuff you choose to do, but don’t really realize you’re making that choice. 
Think of the two Zones as painters.  The Upper Zone is a master of fine and delicate techniques, able to balance several intricate tasks, like a Da Vinci.  The Lower Zone is like the friend that comes over to help you paint your house in exchange for beer and pizza—lots of enthusiasm and energy, but he handles things by flinging paint at the walls. Which does get the job done, admittedly, even if he can’t do much else.
In your brain, Da Vinci and Pizza-and-Beer Guy usually work separately.  But when a job requires familiar, routine motor skills, Da Vinci will buy a six-pack and ask Pizza-and-Beer Guy to come over and help  And they actually work quite well together, for the most part.  Pizza-and-Beer Painter quickly and effectively distributes the paint in the large background areas, and then Da Vinci comes in, tidies up a little, and then starts filling in with the Mona Lisa. 
In real world terms, the neurological Da Vinci + Pizza-and-Beer Guy team-up explains why you can drive to work or school in the morning, and not really recall which route you took to get there or what you saw on the way over.  Da Vinci is in the Upper Zone, organizing your day and reviewing tasks with you, while Pizza-and-Beer Guy is downstairs in the Lower Zone driving your car.  Da Vinci knows that ultimately, the scenery isn’t that important and so doesn’t bother to pay attention to it, while Pizza-and-Beer Guy has all he can handle with getting you safely to work, so he ignores the scenery, too.
The memory expert found that if stressors are introduced in the brain, such as high emotion, lack of sleep, and/or change in routine, then Da Vinci gets overwhelmed trying to manage everything, and Pizza-and-Beer Guy doubles down while still clinging to what he knows. The end result is that Pizza-and-Beer Guy will accidentally paint over large portions  of the Mona Lisa while Da Vinci is dealing with the stress…and Da Vinci won’t notice unless some kind of alarm sounds.
The memory expert then pointed to the case of a mom who exemplified the above:
She had been up most of the night babysitting and caring for her own cranky child (stressor: lack of sleep)
The tired baby slept in his car seat, instead of babbling like he usually did (no audio reminder of child)
Because the mom was planning on bringing the baby’s usual car seat to a fire station for professional installation, the baby was in a different car seat (stressor: change in routine) located behind the driver’s seat where he could not be seen from the rear view mirror (no visual reminder of the child)
Because the family’s second car was being loaned to a relative, the mom drove her husband to work that day (stressor: change in routine #2)
Because her husband was sitting in the front passenger seat, the baby’s diaper bag was placed in the back seat, instead of in the front passenger seat where the mom could see it (stressor: no visual reminder of child, #2)
Because of cell phone conversations with her boss about a crisis at work and with a young relative in trouble, the mom spent most of the drive stressed out solving other people’s problems (stressor: dealing with multiple crises)
This mom’s neurological Da Vinci was swamped dealing with stress. Her neurological Pizza-and-Beer Guy was swamped trying to get her to work that morning.  He painted over the baby, and there were no alarms—no visual or audio reminders—to warn Da Vinci that it had happened.
I say all of that to say this.  Whether or not you leave your baby to die in a hot car has nothing to do with being a fool or loving your kids.  It has to do with unintentional failures of memory under stress.  
Memory is a machine, and it is not perfect.  If you’re capable of forgetting your cell phone, you’re capable of forgetting your child.
Once you understand that, then you can take steps to build in some safeties:
ALWAYS PUT SOMETHING YOU NEED TO HAVE FOR WORK OR SCHOOL IN THE CAR NEXT TO YOUR BABY—your purse, your work ID badge, your laptop or tablet, your cell phone, whatever.  It forces you to look back there, which in turn means you’ll see your baby.
MAKE ARRANGEMENTS WITH YOUR CHILD CARE PROVIDER THAT THEY WILL ALWAYS CALL YOU IF YOU DON’T SHOW UP WITH YOUR BABY, AND THAT YOU WILL ALWAYS CALL THEM IF YOU DON’T SHOW UP AS SCHEDULED.  If they expect to see you by 8am with the baby, and you’re not there, your cell and your office phone should start ringing at 8:01am.
If you can afford it, consider buying a child alert to let you know that the baby’s still in the car.  The one I linked to consists of a sensor that you attach to the baby’s clothes, and a key chain alarm.  It sounds an alarm on your key chain if you walk more than fifteen feet away from the sensor.  Additional key fobs can be purchased.  Other devices are outlined in this article.
The death of a child left in a car is not a failure of love.  It’s a failure of memory.  And it can happen to anyone.
Visit http://www.kidsandcars.org/ for more info.

This is good information, fellow parents, please read! 

battlechicken:

tarot-sybarite:

sizvideos:

Video - Follow us

Okay, so there’s this Pulitzer-prize winning article that was published in the Washington Post a couple of years back.  It’s called Fatal Distraction, and in it the author tries to get to the bottom of why these incidents happen.

The profile of the parent who leaves his or his child to die in a hot car is all over the place.  Race, income level, education level, doesn’t matter.  A very small minority have a history of neglect or abuse, but the vast majority are clearly not abusive parents.  If anything, they’re the kind of parents who dote on their children.

So the author asked a memory expert: if the parents are so focused on the well-being of their children in general, how does this possibly happen? And the memory expert explained it thusly:

Firstly, back in the ’90s, car safety experts announced that the airbags on the passenger-side front seat could kill children, and recommended that child safety seats be moved to the back of the car.  Next, shortly afterwards they recommend that to maximize safety for the very, very young, the seats be turned to that they face the rear.

Following these guidelines—which most parents do, in order to protect their children—does protect the child.  It also very effectively removes a child from a parent’s line of sight.

So what?  Who cares if you can’t see the kids?  What kind of parents forget their kid in the back seat of the car?

The memory expert the author spoke to is a molecular physiologist who researches how stress, emotion, and memory interact with each other.  And he has found the following:

For purposes of this discussion, the brain has two zones.  The Upper Zone has the pre-frontal cortex (which thinks and analyzes) and the hippocampus (makes/holds onto immediate memories).  The Lower Zone has the basal ganglia, which handles voluntary but unconscious actions, like swallowing, leg crossing and uncrossing, etc, stuff you choose to do, but don’t really realize you’re making that choice. 

Think of the two Zones as painters.  The Upper Zone is a master of fine and delicate techniques, able to balance several intricate tasks, like a Da Vinci.  The Lower Zone is like the friend that comes over to help you paint your house in exchange for beer and pizza—lots of enthusiasm and energy, but he handles things by flinging paint at the walls. Which does get the job done, admittedly, even if he can’t do much else.

In your brain, Da Vinci and Pizza-and-Beer Guy usually work separately.  But when a job requires familiar, routine motor skills, Da Vinci will buy a six-pack and ask Pizza-and-Beer Guy to come over and help  And they actually work quite well together, for the most part.  Pizza-and-Beer Painter quickly and effectively distributes the paint in the large background areas, and then Da Vinci comes in, tidies up a little, and then starts filling in with the Mona Lisa. 

In real world terms, the neurological Da Vinci + Pizza-and-Beer Guy team-up explains why you can drive to work or school in the morning, and not really recall which route you took to get there or what you saw on the way over.  Da Vinci is in the Upper Zone, organizing your day and reviewing tasks with you, while Pizza-and-Beer Guy is downstairs in the Lower Zone driving your car.  Da Vinci knows that ultimately, the scenery isn’t that important and so doesn’t bother to pay attention to it, while Pizza-and-Beer Guy has all he can handle with getting you safely to work, so he ignores the scenery, too.

The memory expert found that if stressors are introduced in the brain, such as high emotion, lack of sleep, and/or change in routine, then Da Vinci gets overwhelmed trying to manage everything, and Pizza-and-Beer Guy doubles down while still clinging to what he knows. The end result is that Pizza-and-Beer Guy will accidentally paint over large portions  of the Mona Lisa while Da Vinci is dealing with the stress…and Da Vinci won’t notice unless some kind of alarm sounds.

The memory expert then pointed to the case of a mom who exemplified the above:

  • She had been up most of the night babysitting and caring for her own cranky child (stressor: lack of sleep)
  • The tired baby slept in his car seat, instead of babbling like he usually did (no audio reminder of child)
  • Because the mom was planning on bringing the baby’s usual car seat to a fire station for professional installation, the baby was in a different car seat (stressor: change in routine) located behind the driver’s seat where he could not be seen from the rear view mirror (no visual reminder of the child)
  • Because the family’s second car was being loaned to a relative, the mom drove her husband to work that day (stressor: change in routine #2)
  • Because her husband was sitting in the front passenger seat, the baby’s diaper bag was placed in the back seat, instead of in the front passenger seat where the mom could see it (stressor: no visual reminder of child, #2)
  • Because of cell phone conversations with her boss about a crisis at work and with a young relative in trouble, the mom spent most of the drive stressed out solving other people’s problems (stressor: dealing with multiple crises)

This mom’s neurological Da Vinci was swamped dealing with stress. Her neurological Pizza-and-Beer Guy was swamped trying to get her to work that morning.  He painted over the baby, and there were no alarms—no visual or audio reminders—to warn Da Vinci that it had happened.

I say all of that to say this.  Whether or not you leave your baby to die in a hot car has nothing to do with being a fool or loving your kids.  It has to do with unintentional failures of memory under stress.  

Memory is a machine, and it is not perfect.  If you’re capable of forgetting your cell phone, you’re capable of forgetting your child.

Once you understand that, then you can take steps to build in some safeties:

  1. ALWAYS PUT SOMETHING YOU NEED TO HAVE FOR WORK OR SCHOOL IN THE CAR NEXT TO YOUR BABY—your purse, your work ID badge, your laptop or tablet, your cell phone, whatever.  It forces you to look back there, which in turn means you’ll see your baby.
  2. MAKE ARRANGEMENTS WITH YOUR CHILD CARE PROVIDER THAT THEY WILL ALWAYS CALL YOU IF YOU DON’T SHOW UP WITH YOUR BABY, AND THAT YOU WILL ALWAYS CALL THEM IF YOU DON’T SHOW UP AS SCHEDULED.  If they expect to see you by 8am with the baby, and you’re not there, your cell and your office phone should start ringing at 8:01am.
  3. If you can afford it, consider buying a child alert to let you know that the baby’s still in the car.  The one I linked to consists of a sensor that you attach to the baby’s clothes, and a key chain alarm.  It sounds an alarm on your key chain if you walk more than fifteen feet away from the sensor.  Additional key fobs can be purchased.  Other devices are outlined in this article.

The death of a child left in a car is not a failure of love.  It’s a failure of memory.  And it can happen to anyone.

Visit http://www.kidsandcars.org/ for more info.

This is good information, fellow parents, please read! 


thehealthycook:

1) SPEND TIME EACH WEEK LOOKING FOR RECIPES.This may feel like an indulgence, but just let yourself do it. Browse blogs and websites for recipes that look delicious. Hang out on Tasteologie. Pile up some cookbooks and reach fo the sticky notes. Get inspired!
2) CREATE A PLACE TO SAVE YOUR RECIPES, and keep it SIMPLE. Do whatever works for you. Don’t get caught up in a system, just use whatever works best and most easily. Personally, I like Pinterest because it’s easy to visually browse what I’ve saved. (Watch for another post coming soon with a rundown of our readers’ favorite places to save recipes.
3) ASK OTHERS WHAT THEY WANT TO EAT. Like. your partner, family, and roommates. This might sound obvious, but it’s easy to get caught up in our weeks and forget to ask our households what they would like to eat. I get extra inspired, too, when I feel like I’m cooking a meal as a gift — trying to please and delight the palate of someone I love.
4) KEEP A MEAL JOURNAL. One of my best inspirations is my own record of things I’ve cooked in the past. Take a look at what you were cooking a year ago, two years ago. It’s a good way to remember things you used to cook, and still love.
5) START A CALENDAR. Now that you’re getting inspired in what to eat, start a calendar of what you’d like to cook over the next few days or few weeks. It can be as organized as a Google Calendar, with notes on each day for that day’s menu. Or you can just jot notes to yourself in the corner of your laptop screen. The important thing is to write it down.
6) GO WITH THEME NIGHTS. (soup night, pasta night, beans). I find find it really helpful to have a theme night each week. This doesn’t work for everyone, but it may be especially helpful for those with kids. Keeping the focus narrow will help you and your household make quick recipe decisions.
7) CHOOSE A SHOPPING DAY AND MAKE A LIST. A lot of the readers who seemed to have success in meal planning shopped very purposefully. They looked at their recipes and made a shopping list. Some of the meal planning and recipe-saving services let you do this easily, extracting ingredients from the recipes you have saved.
8) CHECK WHATS ON SALE. Some people really like to organize their meals around sales. Is organic chicken a dollar off this week? Or canned chickpeas? Check out your grocery store circular and adjust your meal plan or shopping list a bit.
9) PLAN FOR LEFTOVERS. Most of us have at least some tolerance for leftovers. I regularly cook one or two big healthy casseroles at the beginning of the week and eat off them all week long for lunch. Some people can only eat leftovers for a single night. Either way, try to make your cooking always do double duty. Make a little extra of everything, and if you don’t want it right away, freeze it.
SOURCE:
http://www.thekitchn.com/10-tips-for-better-weekly-meal-planning-reader-intelligence-report-177252
View Larger

thehealthycook:

1) SPEND TIME EACH WEEK LOOKING FOR RECIPES.
This may feel like an indulgence, but just let yourself do it. Browse blogs and websites for recipes that look delicious. Hang out on Tasteologie. Pile up some cookbooks and reach fo the sticky notes. Get inspired!

2) CREATE A PLACE TO SAVE YOUR RECIPES, and keep it SIMPLE. Do whatever works for you. Don’t get caught up in a system, just use whatever works best and most easily. Personally, I like Pinterest because it’s easy to visually browse what I’ve saved. (Watch for another post coming soon with a rundown of our readers’ favorite places to save recipes.

3) ASK OTHERS WHAT THEY WANT TO EAT. Like. your partner, family, and roommates. This might sound obvious, but it’s easy to get caught up in our weeks and forget to ask our households what they would like to eat. I get extra inspired, too, when I feel like I’m cooking a meal as a gift — trying to please and delight the palate of someone I love.

4) KEEP A MEAL JOURNAL. One of my best inspirations is my own record of things I’ve cooked in the past. Take a look at what you were cooking a year ago, two years ago. It’s a good way to remember things you used to cook, and still love.

5) START A CALENDAR. Now that you’re getting inspired in what to eat, start a calendar of what you’d like to cook over the next few days or few weeks. It can be as organized as a Google Calendar, with notes on each day for that day’s menu. Or you can just jot notes to yourself in the corner of your laptop screen. The important thing is to write it down.

6) GO WITH THEME NIGHTS. (soup night, pasta night, beans). I find find it really helpful to have a theme night each week. This doesn’t work for everyone, but it may be especially helpful for those with kids. Keeping the focus narrow will help you and your household make quick recipe decisions.

7) CHOOSE A SHOPPING DAY AND MAKE A LIST. A lot of the readers who seemed to have success in meal planning shopped very purposefully. They looked at their recipes and made a shopping list. Some of the meal planning and recipe-saving services let you do this easily, extracting ingredients from the recipes you have saved.

8) CHECK WHATS ON SALE. Some people really like to organize their meals around sales. Is organic chicken a dollar off this week? Or canned chickpeas? Check out your grocery store circular and adjust your meal plan or shopping list a bit.

9) PLAN FOR LEFTOVERS. Most of us have at least some tolerance for leftovers. I regularly cook one or two big healthy casseroles at the beginning of the week and eat off them all week long for lunch. Some people can only eat leftovers for a single night. Either way, try to make your cooking always do double duty. Make a little extra of everything, and if you don’t want it right away, freeze it.

SOURCE:

gingerandfair:

prochoice-or-gtfo:

persephoneholly:

mordecaimakara:

iloverennerhawkeye:

chainofaffection:

beyoncesugarbaby:

licquoricebitch:

chainofaffection:

Have you ever come across a homeless individual and felt totally uncomfortable?

You see them and you know they are in need, but you are not sure what to do. You know that handing them money is not the best thing. But, you also see that they clearly have some needs. Their lips are chapped. They are hungry. They are thirsty. They are asking for help.

How can you help?

Here is a simple idea - blessing bags.
This was such an easy project. We are now going to keep a few “Blessing Bags” in our car so that when we do happen to see someone on the streets who is homeless, we can hand them a Blessing Bag. I first learned of these bags from my friend, Julie. I am using the picture of her bags (see above) because the ones we took were taken in horrible lighting and turned out really grainy and hard to see what is inside of them.

If you’d like to make your own Blessing Bags, this is what you would need:

Gallon size Ziplock bags
items to go in the bags, such as:
chap stick
packages of tissues
toothbrush and toothpaste
comb
soap
trail mix
granola bars
crackers
pack of gum
band aids
mouthwash
coins (could be used to make a phone call, or purchase a food item)
hand wipes
you could also put in a warm pair of socks, and maybe a Starbucks gift card

Assemble all the items in the bags, and maybe throw in a note of encouragement. Seal the bags and stow in your car for a moment of providence.

This would be a great activity to do with some other families. Each family could bring one of the items going into the bags (ex: toothbrushes). Set up all the items around a table and walk around it with the ziplocks and fill the bags.

http://kwavs.blogspot.com/2011/05/blessing-bags-how-to.html

oh man i wanna do this

mee tooo. im bout to go to the dollar tree and rack up or a wholesale store.

All these reblogs make me so happy to see. So many amazing people on tumblr

random acts if kindness

please include a couple pairs of socks actually! Socks are among the most highly desired clothing item for homeless individuals

Instead of putting actual food items in the bag I highly, HIGHLY suggest you instead put gift cards to Starbucks, McDonalds, Dunkin’ Donuts, or any other fast food restaurant that sells coffee. Reason? 1. It’s indoors with seating, it allows the person to get out of the cold/heat for a bit while also getting something to eat or drink. 2. Coffee is always a nice hot beverage. 3. Food allergies, you don’t know if the homeless person can or can’t eat the granola or other food you’ve packed for them also, they can order good they like. I also recommend a gift card to a nearby grocery store, Target, Walmart, Kmart, etc. that way they can buy easy-to-carry good they like/are not allergic to.

Another reason to give restaurant gift cards? From my personal experience, fast food staff often know the homeless customers who come in, and treat them extra nicely. Where I worked, we often snuck extra food into their order, or gave them a free newspaper. I can’t speak for all fast food employees, but homeless folks were often some of the kindest customers that we got in, because they were just grateful for a warm place to sit for a while, and didn’t act like they were better than us who were working for minimum wage.

This is an amazing idea.
View Larger

gingerandfair:

prochoice-or-gtfo:

persephoneholly:

mordecaimakara:

iloverennerhawkeye:

chainofaffection:

beyoncesugarbaby:

licquoricebitch:

chainofaffection:

Have you ever come across a homeless individual and felt totally uncomfortable?
You see them and you know they are in need, but you are not sure what to do. You know that handing them money is not the best thing. But, you also see that they clearly have some needs. Their lips are chapped. They are hungry. They are thirsty. They are asking for help.
How can you help?
Here is a simple idea - blessing bags.

This was such an easy project. We are now going to keep a few “Blessing Bags” in our car so that when we do happen to see someone on the streets who is homeless, we can hand them a Blessing Bag. I first learned of these bags from my friend, Julie. I am using the picture of her bags (see above) because the ones we took were taken in horrible lighting and turned out really grainy and hard to see what is inside of them.

If you’d like to make your own Blessing Bags, this is what you would need:
Gallon size Ziplock bags
items to go in the bags, such as:
chap stick
packages of tissues
toothbrush and toothpaste
comb
soap
trail mix
granola bars
crackers
pack of gum
band aids
mouthwash
coins (could be used to make a phone call, or purchase a food item)
hand wipes
you could also put in a warm pair of socks, and maybe a Starbucks gift card
Assemble all the items in the bags, and maybe throw in a note of encouragement. Seal the bags and stow in your car for a moment of providence.
This would be a great activity to do with some other families. Each family could bring one of the items going into the bags (ex: toothbrushes). Set up all the items around a table and walk around it with the ziplocks and fill the bags.

oh man i wanna do this

mee tooo. im bout to go to the dollar tree and rack up or a wholesale store.

All these reblogs make me so happy to see. So many amazing people on tumblr

random acts if kindness

please include a couple pairs of socks actually! Socks are among the most highly desired clothing item for homeless individuals

Instead of putting actual food items in the bag I highly, HIGHLY suggest you instead put gift cards to Starbucks, McDonalds, Dunkin’ Donuts, or any other fast food restaurant that sells coffee. Reason? 1. It’s indoors with seating, it allows the person to get out of the cold/heat for a bit while also getting something to eat or drink. 2. Coffee is always a nice hot beverage. 3. Food allergies, you don’t know if the homeless person can or can’t eat the granola or other food you’ve packed for them also, they can order good they like. I also recommend a gift card to a nearby grocery store, Target, Walmart, Kmart, etc. that way they can buy easy-to-carry good they like/are not allergic to.

Another reason to give restaurant gift cards? From my personal experience, fast food staff often know the homeless customers who come in, and treat them extra nicely. Where I worked, we often snuck extra food into their order, or gave them a free newspaper. I can’t speak for all fast food employees, but homeless folks were often some of the kindest customers that we got in, because they were just grateful for a warm place to sit for a while, and didn’t act like they were better than us who were working for minimum wage.

This is an amazing idea.

(Source: yourpersonalcheerleader)


poutineisdelicious:

xekstrin:

majere636:

arachnofiend:

marapetsrules:

bobfoxsky:


“You fool. No man can kill me.”

How many times am I allowed to reblog this before it gets weird?



Fun facts: Tolkien constructed this scene because he came out of Macbeth thinking that Shakespeare had missed a golden opportunity with the ”Be bloody, bold, and resolute; laugh to scorn the power of man, for none of woman born shall harm Macbeth” prophecy

Being letdown by Macbeth is apparently a significant factor in Tolkien’s writing because the Ent/Huorn attack on Isengard was the result of his disappointment that the whole “til Birnam Wood come to Dunsinane” thing was just some dudes holding sticks and not actual ambulatory trees.

so he basically took his favorite shakespeare headcanons and put them into his AU fic

This revelation just knocked me over.
poutineisdelicious:

xekstrin:

majere636:

arachnofiend:

marapetsrules:

bobfoxsky:


“You fool. No man can kill me.”

How many times am I allowed to reblog this before it gets weird?



Fun facts: Tolkien constructed this scene because he came out of Macbeth thinking that Shakespeare had missed a golden opportunity with the ”Be bloody, bold, and resolute; laugh to scorn the power of man, for none of woman born shall harm Macbeth” prophecy

Being letdown by Macbeth is apparently a significant factor in Tolkien’s writing because the Ent/Huorn attack on Isengard was the result of his disappointment that the whole “til Birnam Wood come to Dunsinane” thing was just some dudes holding sticks and not actual ambulatory trees.

so he basically took his favorite shakespeare headcanons and put them into his AU fic

This revelation just knocked me over.
poutineisdelicious:

xekstrin:

majere636:

arachnofiend:

marapetsrules:

bobfoxsky:


“You fool. No man can kill me.”

How many times am I allowed to reblog this before it gets weird?



Fun facts: Tolkien constructed this scene because he came out of Macbeth thinking that Shakespeare had missed a golden opportunity with the ”Be bloody, bold, and resolute; laugh to scorn the power of man, for none of woman born shall harm Macbeth” prophecy

Being letdown by Macbeth is apparently a significant factor in Tolkien’s writing because the Ent/Huorn attack on Isengard was the result of his disappointment that the whole “til Birnam Wood come to Dunsinane” thing was just some dudes holding sticks and not actual ambulatory trees.

so he basically took his favorite shakespeare headcanons and put them into his AU fic

This revelation just knocked me over.
poutineisdelicious:

xekstrin:

majere636:

arachnofiend:

marapetsrules:

bobfoxsky:


“You fool. No man can kill me.”

How many times am I allowed to reblog this before it gets weird?



Fun facts: Tolkien constructed this scene because he came out of Macbeth thinking that Shakespeare had missed a golden opportunity with the ”Be bloody, bold, and resolute; laugh to scorn the power of man, for none of woman born shall harm Macbeth” prophecy

Being letdown by Macbeth is apparently a significant factor in Tolkien’s writing because the Ent/Huorn attack on Isengard was the result of his disappointment that the whole “til Birnam Wood come to Dunsinane” thing was just some dudes holding sticks and not actual ambulatory trees.

so he basically took his favorite shakespeare headcanons and put them into his AU fic

This revelation just knocked me over.

poutineisdelicious:

xekstrin:

majere636:

arachnofiend:

marapetsrules:

bobfoxsky:

“You fool. No man can kill me.”

How many times am I allowed to reblog this before it gets weird?

image

Fun facts: Tolkien constructed this scene because he came out of Macbeth thinking that Shakespeare had missed a golden opportunity with the ”Be bloody, bold, and resolute; laugh to scorn the power of man, for none of woman born shall harm Macbeth” prophecy

Being letdown by Macbeth is apparently a significant factor in Tolkien’s writing because the Ent/Huorn attack on Isengard was the result of his disappointment that the whole “til Birnam Wood come to Dunsinane” thing was just some dudes holding sticks and not actual ambulatory trees.

so he basically took his favorite shakespeare headcanons and put them into his AU fic

This revelation just knocked me over.

(Source: the-peoples-of-middle-earth)